Re: Re: "Ideas have a life of their own"

From: Joel.M Dimech (j.marie.dimech@wanadoo.fr)
Date: Wed 03 Mar 2004 - 13:36:14 GMT

  • Next message: Chris Taylor: "Model employee vs. psychopath"

    For purposes of patient care it's important to account for the human nature, including the only linguistic-real things that have been lived through. The only linguistic-real part of the experienced life (ideas that have a life of their own) is one side of the powerful human self-defence mechanism - psychology. For purposes of understanding how the synergy individual-experienced life works, clinical and experimental psychologists have to use a bigger scale of interaction than this one. To change up into a bigger scale of interaction implies the psychologist denies his own self-defence mechanism. The denial of the self-defence mechanism, and its variable consequences (psychological troubles and interaction difficulties), is the constant material of any psychotherapy. It's quite natural then that the community of psychologists is divided, from one side those who practice psychotherapy, from the other side clinical experimentalists who don't. Most of clinical psychologists are involved in the help of various kinds of disabled children (autistic children for example don't have psychological troubles, they can't have since one of the autistic issue is the non-operational nature of the self-defence mechanism). In my humble opinion, only metaphysics is to liken "sociology experiencing schisms" to the reality of psychology.
    > Message du 03/03/04 06:51
    > De : Keith Henson
    > A : memetics@mmu.ac.uk
    > Copie :
    > Objet : Re: "Ideas have a life of their own"
    > "While there are differences between, among, and within the creative
    > sociologies, they all belong together in their resistance to using the
    > methods of the natural sciences in studying social phenomena. Underlying
    > them all is the assumption that human beings are different from the subject
    > matter of other sciences in that they create, or construct, their social
    > reality in interaction. They are joined in their opposition to sociological
    > approaches that assume that human behavior is determined by social structure.
    >
    > "Sociology is not the only discipline experiencing schisms of this
    > kind. It is well known that the field of psychology is sharply divided
    > between "humanists" and clinical or experimental psychologists, 1 but it
    > is, perhaps, less commonly known that similar differences divide
    > anthropologists and historians of science, as well as those in other
    > disciplines, including some of the natural sciences. In the history of
    > science, the debate is between the "internalists" and the "externalists."
    >
    > "The question concerns whether the origin and growth of science
    > depend upon factors external to the substance of science itself, such as
    > social and economic influences, or whether scientific ideas have a life of
    > their own, insulated from the general cultural, economic, and social state
    > of a nation or a community of nations. 2"
    >
    > Page 173
    >
    > _An Excursion into Creative Sociology_ by Monica B. Morris; Columbia
    > University Press, 1977
    >
    > You sure find some bizarre statements in Sociology because both halves of
    > the last sentence are true. It is historically obvious that social and
    > economic influences had a determining role in the origin and growth of
    > science, early science having very much depended on people with time and
    > money to spend on it. It is also true that what science finds, such as
    > elements, is "insulated from the general cultural economic, and social
    > state of a nation or a community of nations."
    >
    > (Assuming a consistent real word, materials studies will find about a
    > hundred chemical elements, and you are no more likely to find an element
    > between carbon and nitrogen than you are to find a whole number between 6
    > and 7.)
    >
    > Keith Henson
    >
    >
    >
    > ===============================================================
    > This was distributed via the memetics list associated with the
    > Journal of Memetics - Evolutionary Models of Information Transmission
    > For information about the journal and the list (e.g. unsubscribing)
    > see: http://www.cpm.mmu.ac.uk/jom-emit
    >
    >

    =============================================================== This was distributed via the memetics list associated with the Journal of Memetics - Evolutionary Models of Information Transmission For information about the journal and the list (e.g. unsubscribing) see: http://www.cpm.mmu.ac.uk/jom-emit



    This archive was generated by hypermail 2.1.5 : Wed 03 Mar 2004 - 13:46:55 GMT